From the Chair

I often ask my students to create a knowledge map that illustrates as many of their inspirations and influences as they can recall. As you can imagine, asking the question in the context of an art course would return a long list of visual artists, often confined to...

From the Chair

Seeing is Forgetting the Name of the Thing One Sees is a book written by Lawrence Weschler in 1982 about the West Coast conceptual artist Robert Irwin. The book explores the dislocation that occurs in the face of Irwin’s early work with light and space. His conceptual...

From the Chair

The terminology by which we describe and communicate ideas about art is, by its very nature, limiting. The limitations of language create a space of discourse with boundaries and hard surfaces to push against in order to expand our understanding of that which is the...

From the Chair

Our elevator in the Humanities Building stopped working last week, and while it may seem a minor inconvenience on the surface, I immediately felt a sense of shame for how it impacted our students with disabilities and any other community members who are affected. I...

From the Chair

Twenty-first century institutions of art are spaces in which compassion, empathy, and institutional responsibility must be carefully balanced. Those who choose a career in the arts must be particularly responsive to the changes in cultural expectations while still...

From the Chair

In a short book, The Gift, written in 1966 by the French sociologist Marcel Mauss, the author distinguishes the numerous differences between historically understood gift economies; in which interactions are almost always reciprocal and more often than not used to...